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Monday, 30 October 2017 00:00

Causes and Symptoms of Athlete's Foot

If you are experiencing scaly and peeling skin, itchiness, and redness on the soles of the feet or in between the toes, you may have athlete's foot. Athlete's foot, also known as "jungle rot" to military service members, is a fungal infection of the foot. In some cases, small blisters can form and pain can be present as well. The fungus can be contagious and can come from many sources, including gyms, locker rooms, swimming pools, public showers, nail salons, and contaminated clothing. Topical creams are a common treatment for this condition, however, seeing a podiatrist is often a better option. Above all, prevention is the best method to stop athlete's foot which means keeping the feet dry and protected from certain environments. Tips on how to prevent athlete's foot include: wearing sweat-absorbent socks, breathable shoes, using foot powder, washing the feet daily, and wearing shower shoes in locker rooms and showers.

Athlete’s foot is an inconvenient condition that can be easily reduced with the proper treatment. If you have any concerns about your feet and ankles, contact Dr. Danita Reese from Family Foot Clinic, PC.  Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Athlete’s Foot: The Sole Story

Athlete's foot, also known as tinea pedis, can be an extremely contagious foot infection. It is commonly contracted in public changing areas and bathrooms, dormitory style living quarters, around locker rooms and public swimming pools, or anywhere your feet often come into contact with other people.

Solutions to Combat Athlete’s Foot

  • Hydrate your feet by using lotion
  • Exfoliate
  • Buff off nails
  • Use of anti-fungal products
  • Examine your feet and visit your doctor if any suspicious blisters or cuts develop

Athlete’s foot can cause many irritating symptoms such as dry and flaking skin, itching, and redness. Some more severe symptoms can include bleeding and cracked skin, intense itching and burning, and even pain when walking. In the worst cases, Athlete’s foot can cause blistering as well. Speak to your podiatrist for a better understanding of the different causes of Athlete’s foot, as well as help in determining which treatment options are best for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in South Hill, VA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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A recent study published in the Arthritis Care and Research journal found that those who are obese and have rheumatoid arthritis may benefit greatly from bariatric, or weight-loss, surgery. While the study needs more research before conclusive results can be firmly established, early statistics note huge improvements in patients.  Out of the 53 patients who have rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and undergone bariatric surgery, only six percent were found to have moderate to severe disease activity 12 months after surgery. Six years after having the surgery, 74 percent of the patients were classified as being in remission. This contrasted with the only 24 percent achieving remission with RA medications before surgery.  While these results are excellent, there are many factors that are unknown; one such factor is whether bariatric surgery is more effective in reducing RA symptoms than diet and exercise. Furthermore, bariatric surgery may potentially lead to osteoporosis, a condition characterized by weak and brittle bones.. Ultimately, for those who have RA, are obese, and considering bariatric surgery, there are many factors that have to be taken into account. If you are overweight and suffer from arthritic pain in your feet, consulting with a podiatrist is recommended. 
 

Because RA affects more than just your joints, including the joints in your feet and ankles, it is important to seek early diagnosis from your podiatrist  if you feel like the pain in your feet might be caused by RA. For more information, contact Dr. Danita Reese of Family Foot Clinic, PC. Our doctor will assist you with all of your podiatric concerns.

What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disorder in which the body’s own immune system attacks the membranes surrounding the joints. Inflammation of the lining and eventually the destruction of the joint’s cartilage and bone occur, causing severe pain and immobility.

Rheumatoid Arthritis of the Feet

Although RA usually attacks multiple bones and joints throughout the entire body, almost 90 percent of cases result in pain in the foot or ankle area.

Symptoms

  • Swelling and pain in the feet
  • Stiffness in the feet
  • Pain on the ball or sole of feet
  • Joint shift and deformation

Diagnosis

Quick diagnosis of RA in the feet is important so that the podiatrist can treat the area effectively. Your doctor will ask you about your medical history, occupation, and lifestyle to determine the origin of the condition. Rheumatoid Factor tests help to determine if someone is affected by the disease.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in South Hill, VA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 16 October 2017 00:00

What are Stress Fractures?

Stress fractures are small hairline fractures in the bone that most often occur from overuse. When the muscles in the body are fatigued, they can become unable to handle repeated shocks to the area. The shock instead transfers to the bone, which can crack. Most often, stress fractures occur in areas of the lower body like the feet and legs. The most common symptom of a stress fracture is pain in the area. If you are experiencing pain in the foot and ankle and think you may have a stress fracture, it is recommended to see a podiatrist. Rest is often the number one method in helping a stress fracture heal. Braces, pain medication, and ice may also be recommended, though not always. To prevent stress fractures, it is advised to start any new athletic activity slowly, gradually work your way up, and stop if you feel pain or have been pushing yourself with little rest.

Activities where too much pressure is put on the feet can cause stress fractures. To learn more, contact Dr. Danita Reese from Family Foot Clinic, PC. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep your pain free and on your feet.

Dealing with Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle

Stress fractures occur in the foot and ankle when muscles in these areas weaken from too much or too little use.  The feet and ankles then lose support when walking or running from the impact of the ground. Since there is no protection, the bones receive the full impact of each step. Stress on the feet can cause cracks to form in the bones, thus creating stress fractures.

What are Stress Fractures?

Stress fractures occur frequently in individuals whose daily activities cause great impact on the feet and ankles. Stress factors are most common among:

  • Runners                                  
  • People affected with Osteoporosis
  • Tennis or basketball players
  • Gymnasts
  • High impact workouts

Symptoms

Pain from the fractures occur in the area of the fractures and can be constant or intermittent. It will often cause sharp or dull pain with swelling and tenderness. Engaging in any kind of activity which involves high impact will aggravate pain.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in South Hill, VA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Have your feet ever felt numb while you were working out? If so, then you may have experienced paresthesia, a numbness or prickling sensation that many people have temporarily experienced in their life. It is often described as a “pins and needles” sensation that usually goes away once the position of the body changes. Paresthesia is usually caused by a pinched nerve or reduced blood flow to a part of the body. When it comes to working out, the exercises we do can put our body in positions that may reduce blood flow. In other cases, the muscles can swell due to increased blood flow from exercising. Paresthesia is usually a normal condition and often goes away. Not everyone will experience paresthesia or foot swelling, and in most cases it isn’t serious. If, however, your feet have swollen up, feel numb, or you experience pain that doesn’t go away, it is recommended to see a podiatrist.
 

Poor circulation is a serious condition and needs immediate medical attention. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact Dr. Danita Reese of Family Foot Clinic, PC. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs is can be caused by peripheral artery disease (PAD), which is the result of a buildup of plaque in the arteries.

Plaque buildup or atherosclerosis results from excess calcium and cholesterol in the bloodstream. This can restrict the amount of blood which can flow through the arteries. Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs are sometimes caused by inflammation in the blood vessels, known as vasculitis.

Causes

Lack of oxygen and oxygen from poor blood circulation restricts muscle growth and development. It can also cause:

  • Muscle pain, stiffness, or weakness   
  • Numbness  or cramping in the legs 
  • Skin discoloration
  • Slower nail & hair growth
  • Erectile dysfunction

Those who have diabetes or smoke are at greatest risk for poor circulation, as are those who are over 50. If you have poor circulation in the feet and legs it may be caused by PAD, and is important to make changes to your lifestyle in order to reduce risk of getting a heart attack or stroke. Exercise and maintaining a healthy lifestyle will dramatically improve conditions.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in South Hill, VA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 02 October 2017 00:00

Facts About Falls and Fall Prevention

Falls and their effects on the elderly are, unfortunately, not reported on enough. This lack of reporting prevents overall awareness and the spread of knowledge in how to prevent them. Fortunately this has been changing in the past several years, with 2008 marking the first year that Falls Prevention Awareness Day was held by the National Council on Aging (NCOA). Despite this, awareness of the issue has a long way to go. Here are some facts about falls and falls prevention. Those who are age 65 or older and who have been to the emergency department are unlikely to engage in falls-prevention programs once discharged. While it has been reported that regular strength and flexibility programs for the elderly help prevent falls, some practices like Tai Chi have been found to help as well. Finally, elderly persons who have a history of falls, have suffered from a previous fracture, and have a body mass index (BMI) of 20 kg/m² are more likely to suffer another fracture.

Preventing falls among the elderly is very important. If you are older and have fallen or fear that you are prone to falling, consult with Dr. Danita Reese from Family Foot Clinic, PC. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality advice and care.

Every 11 seconds, an elderly American is being treated in an emergency room for a fall related injury. Falls are the leading cause of head and hip injuries for those 65 and older. Due to decreases in strength, balance, senses, and lack of awareness, elderly persons are very susceptible to falling. Thankfully, there are a number of things older persons can do to prevent falls.

How to Prevent Falls

Some effective methods that older persons can do to prevent falls include:

  • Enrolling in strength and balance exercise program to increase balance and strength
  • Periodically having your sight and hearing checked
  • Discuss any medications you have with a doctor to see if it increases the risk of falling
  • Clearing the house of falling hazards and installing devices like grab bars and railings
  • Utilizing a walker or cane
  • Wearing shoes that provide good support and cushioning
  • Talking to family members about falling and increasing awareness

Falling can be a traumatic and embarrassing experience for elderly persons; this can make them less willing to leave the house, and less willing to talk to someone about their fears of falling. Doing such things, however, will increase the likelihood of tripping or losing one’s balance. Knowing the causes of falling and how to prevent them is the best way to mitigate the risk of serious injury.  

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in South Hill, VA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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